Holy Trinity Primary School

"Rooted in Christ, Growing Together"

Year R Year 6 Year 2 Year 5 Year 3 Year 1 Year 4 Holy Trinity Primary School Artwork by Air In The Square (Benjamin Brooks and Phil Thompson)

School Background and Context

Holy Trinity VA Primary School was opened in 1993 and built to accommodate 210 children. It was built as part of a church ‘plant’ in a new town, and the first vicar of Holy Trinity church had a clear vision of providing a distinctive Christian education as outreach of the work of the church. This distinctive Christian ethos is apparent in all parts of the life of the school.

Our vision statement clearly articulates the desire of the staff and governors to put Christian values at the heart of the school. All teaching and support staff agree to support and promote the Christian life of the school. The school is situated on the north of Bradley Stoke.

Our school vision is: Rooted in Christ, Growing Together

Holy Trinity Primary School is a place where we hold our Christian Character very dear. We aim to provide an education of the highest quality, in a Christian context, and promote Christian values by offering broad and rich experiences. This will then prepare all of our children to be happy, successful adults who can take their place confidently in the world and make a positive impact on those around them.

We are a school where adults and children alike are learning together, growing in their faith and understanding, ensuring that all feel included and special. Holy Trinity is a place where all children can flourish and bloom.

Voluntary aided school :

A voluntary aided school is a school in England where the governing body, as opposed to the Local Education Authority, employs the staff, and decides the admission arrangements, but the school is funded by the state and can’t charge fees. The governing body is usually controlled by a foundation or trust which often own the school’s land and buildings and can appoint a majority of the governors. The governing body may contribute towards the capital costs of maintaining the fabric of the school but, even so, the bulk of the funding (e.g., for teachers’ salaries) comes from the state.

A very large number of so-called state schools are in fact voluntary aided and most of these schools are linked to either the Church of England or the Roman Catholic Church. But there have been schools linked to other faith groups, and there is now an increasing number of non-denominational schools.
Holy Trinity is linked to the Church of England and the Methodist Church.